Posts for: June, 2018

By Varble Orthodontics
June 23, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: dental injury  
JuneIsNationalSafetyMonthBePreparedforDentalEmergencies

The National Safety Council has designated June as National Safety Month. A key component of staying safe is being prepared for emergencies, and this includes dental emergencies. Would you know what to do if you suffered any of the following dental mishaps?

Chipped tooth: One common dental injury is a chipped tooth. If this happens to you, save the missing chip if possible because we may be able to bond it back onto the tooth—but don’t be tempted to glue the chip back on by yourself! However, even without the missing chip, the tooth can most often be repaired with bonding material.

Cracked tooth: If you crack a tooth, rinse your mouth with warm water. If it is bleeding, hold a clean washcloth or gauze to the area until the bleeding stops, but don’t wiggle the tooth around or bite down hard. Keep in mind that the sooner your tooth is repaired, the better. Depending on how bad the crack is, if the tooth can be treated, it will most likely continue to function pain-free for years to come.

Displaced (“luxated”) tooth: If an injury causes your tooth to become loose, shoves it sideways or pushes it into or out of its socket, don’t try to force the tooth back into position on your own. Instead, call the dental office right away and leave it to us to bring the tooth back into its proper place and determine the extent of the injury.

Knocked out tooth: If a permanent tooth is knocked out of your mouth, pick it up without touching the root and rinse it off with cold water, but do not scrub. For the best chance of saving the tooth, place it firmly back in its socket within five minutes and hold it in position for a few minutes. If this is not possible, keep the tooth between your cheek and gum or in a glass of cold milk so that it doesn’t dry out. Call the dental office immediately.

If a baby tooth is knocked out, there is no need to place it back in the socket since baby teeth are not reattached. However, it is still important to have us examine the injury.

Being prepared for dental emergencies can help save a tooth as well as avoid more costly dental treatment down the road. But no matter what type of dental injury you have, it is important to come in for a consultation as the injury may extend beyond the part of the tooth that is visible. With today’s materials and technology, there’s a very good chance your smile can look as good as before—and often even better!

If you have questions about dental injuries, please contact our office or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Trauma and Nerve Damage to Teeth” and “Artistic Repair of Front Teeth with Composite Resin.”


By Varble Orthodontics
June 13, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene   tooth decay  
CapsGownsandSmilesforHighSchoolGraduation

High school graduation marks the end of childhood and the beginning of young adulthood. Do you have a graduate in your family? If so, this is the ideal time to schedule a dental checkup and cleaning. Many graduates will be moving away to attend college, and an oral exam and cleaning now can help ensure that they will embark on this next phase of life in good oral health.

Is your graduate ready for the barrage of camera snaps? Long after graduation day, pictures of your graduate beaming in cap and gown will be on display. A professional teeth cleaning may be just what is needed for a camera-ready smile. The dental hygienist will use an electronic polishing tool to remove many stains from the teeth for a sparkling smile.

What’s more, the dental hygienist uses special tools to get rid of plaque and tartar that can cause bad breath, a common concern among teens and young adults. Bad breath is primarily caused by poor oral hygiene habits, and the hygienist can check to see if your teen’s oral hygiene routine has been too lax—and offer pointers if needed. It’s never too late to form better brushing and flossing habits, especially if your graduate will soon be living away from home!

A dental exam will reveal tooth decay or gum disease, problems that will only get worse if not taken care of. Another reason why dental exams are important at this time is that wisdom teeth—or third molars—generally appear between ages 17–21. Although these teeth sometimes come in without any problem, many wisdom teeth become impacted and must be removed, so it’s important to monitor them during regular dental checkups.

Take time to schedule a dental exam and cleaning so your graduate can march into a bright future armed with a big smile and the best oral health.

If you have questions about teen oral health concerns, please contact our office or schedule a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Wisdom Teeth” and “How to Help Your Child Develop the Best Habits for Oral Health.”


DontAllowYourAgetoStopYoufromaNewSmilewithOrthodontics

Think you’re too old to have your teeth straightened? In reality, healthy teeth can be moved at any age to better positions. For the many adults who have some form of malocclusion (bad bite), orthodontics is still a viable option even in later years.

As important as it is to self-image and confidence, treating misaligned teeth can benefit you more than just improving your smile. Misaligned teeth may be harder to keep clean, setting up a mouth environment advantageous to the development of tooth decay or periodontal (gum) disease, the risks of both rising with age. And normally aligned teeth are easier to chew with than those misaligned.

Age isn’t the determining factor for whether you’re a good candidate for orthodontics — but your dental health is. Gum disease in particular can cause supporting bone loss, which can complicate orthodontic treatment. It’s important then that we first perform a complete oral examination and attempt to treat problems such as decay or gum disease first before attempting tooth movement.

What type of orthodontic treatment you’ll need will depend on the type of malocclusion you have and its relationship to the way your jaws fit together. Because your adult jaws have fully developed you may need orthognathic (“jaw straightening”) surgery to address certain advanced forms of malocclusion. If your bite problems aren’t that severe (the majority of situations) they can be treated with braces or, an increasingly popular alternative, clear aligners. These customized clear plastic trays are nearly invisible compared to metal braces and are effective for most patients.

Following the completion of tooth movement and other bite procedures, you will most likely need to wear a retainer to help prevent the teeth from reverting to their older positions. You may need to wear the retainer for a longer period than a younger patient, or perhaps indefinitely. Even with this mild inconvenience, though, you’ll still experience the positive effects of healthier and better functioning teeth and a great new smile.

If you would like more information on orthodontic treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Orthodontics for the Older Adult.”